‘This One’s … about a Threesome’: My Night At Dodie

As some of my more avid Twitter followers — like I have avid Twitter followers — may, or may not, know, last night I went to London, to attend an event which I have been extremely excited about since I booked tickets for it back in December. I went off into Shepherd’s Bush (DO NOT LAUGH), to see Dodie, YouTubing, singing, songwriting, vlogging queen. Need I say more?

I’ve attended several concerts in my time; my 16 years on this Earth have taken me as far as … London, I suppose, to see acts like The Saturdays (I was, like, 10: don’t judge), and Alessia Cara. I am cool. I love going to live music events: there’s something so bizarre about having your favourite artists — maybe even your idols — standing in the same room as you, breathing the same air, filling the same space. Honestly, I guess it’s a bit weird: we attend live music events, to scream blue murder at our favourite singers, in the most unsettling welcome ever, before yellng THEIR OWN LYRICS at them, despite the obvious fact that they are able to sing them to us with significantly more musical technique.

Still, I love it.

Going to see Dodie felt different, even before I set off for the venue. Sure, the gig was big — the shepherd’s Bush Empire seats 2000, and this was Dodie’s second sold-out show there. but it’s not big enough for the gig to stop feeling intimate, and to stop the feeling that dodie was genuinely interested in the people who were there, genuinely happy that we came to see her on-stage. That could be Dodie herself, though; in fact, I suspect it is. But being in a crowd of 5, 10, 20 times the size of last night’s begins to make individuals feel irrelevant, and the gig feel so much less personal.

The support acts — Fenne Lily, and Skinny living — were incredible. The dialogue between them and the crowd, the excitement of the fans, and their music was such a brilliant thing to be a part of.

There was something really magical about the behaviour of the crowd throughout the evening, which I’ve genuinely just never seen before. When the venue played music between acts, and before the concert began, you could hear the excitement building in people’s voices, in the ways everyone chattered and laughed in anticipation. Then, a song would come on — American Boy, being the one that sticks in my head. There was an audible gasp of recognition from the crowd during that opening bit, you know with the long note at the start, before THE WHOLE VENUE burst into a sing-along session when the lyrics came in. It was incredible: it just made me think that I was part of something, in a group of around 2000 people who were just like me, united by our love of Dodie, and of music, and of our culture.

When Dodie came on stage, the crowd erupted. There were cheers and screams, and I was screaming and screaming, cheering and grinning, indescribably excited to finally be in her crowd, at her show. From the first bar of the first song — Would You Be So Kind — the crowd was in full-swing, the wonderfully-relatable lyrics echoing around the venue as Dodie led a chorus of 2000 adoring fans, each of us singing her own words back to her with such adoration and admiration.

Her set was fantastic, old mixed with new, all interspersed with funny, lovely pieces of dialogue. Dodie is always so relatable, and so genuine, down-to-Earth. She doesn’t seem like she’s living in another world, despite the tendencies of some YouTube sensations to do just that. Every word, and every song, meant something to her — of course –, but they meant something to us too, something individual and unique, something so rare, so delicate, and yet so treasurable.

I don’t think I will ever forget the way she introduced her last song of the night. She’d thanked her band, her tour-team, her support acts, her fans. The band played on behind her, as she looked out into the crowd and said: ‘And this one’s … about a threesome’.

The crowd of teenagers went mad. It was pure magic.

I hate to lower the mood, but it’s made me think of the devastating, awful terror attack in Manchester, almost a year ago now. At the time, I remember being gutted and disgusted, as I am with all terror attacks, but more so because of its context. As well as defenceless children, that man attacked a culture. There is so much to be fixed in the world, so many wrongs that must be righted. But the unity and pure joy of young people, the progressive culture that we are striving for, and creating in every way we can, cannot be broken. I think this is so obvious, and so apparent, at concerts: young people everywhere, thousands joint in unity, expressing themselves, and having fun. This is, in many ways, the ultimate act of defiance, an inescapable demonstration that we are not broken, that we are strong, and that we will stick together, stick to our culture, and ralley together when we have a cause.

Hate never wins.

Kel XX

7 thoughts on “‘This One’s … about a Threesome’: My Night At Dodie

  1. This was absolutely beautiful and captured the magic of that evening. I understand a little of how this feels, the indescribable joy that fills up your heart, the power that fills a room and you as individuals. This seems like such an expression of life in one concert. I’m so, so happy you had such a great night. Yes, hate never wins. It’s such a powerful statement that rings true. Also – IN THE MIIIDLE

    Liked by 1 person

Something to Say?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.